New Hampshire ESL Teacher Job Description and Certification Requirements

New Hampshire’s foreign-born community may be relatively small, but it’s an important part of this state’s economic vitality. In fact, according to the American Immigration Council, immigrants account for 18 percent of all computer and math scientists in the state and 11 percent of all production workers.

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The Master of Arts in Teaching - TESOL online program from the USC Rossier School of Education prepares you to teach students of all ages in the U.S. and internationally, gives you the option to pursue a teaching credential, and can be completed in 12 months.
Campbellsville University Offers an ESL Endorsement (P-12), M.A. in Teaching - Secondary Education, M.A. in TESOL
Liberty University Offers Undergrad Cert and B.Ed. in English as a Second Language.
Greenville University Offers a Master of Arts in Education - Teaching English as a Second Language (ESL)
George Mason University Offers a Master of Education (MEd) in Curriculum and Instruction, Concentration in TESOL
Capella University offers online Master’s program in English Language Learning and Teaching designed to help educators advance their career in supporting diverse student populations. While it does not satisfy licensure requirements, the program can help you build the skills to use instructional strategies, emerging trends, and best practices to effectively teach English Language Learners to help students adapt to new cultural environments.
St. John's University Offers an Online Ph.D. in Literacy

As of 2018, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reported that New Hampshire English language learners (ELLs) accounted for 2.9 percent of all public school students (PreK-12) – a steady increase, year over year, a generation ago when they comprised just 1.3 percent of all students.

These steps will show you exactly how to earn TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) certification and become an ESL teacher in New Hampshire:

#1 ButtonEarn a Degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and Qualify to Become an ESL Teacher in New Hampshire
#2 ButtonPass the Appropriate Praxis Exams
#3 ButtonComplete Your Teaching Requirements and Electronic Portfolio
#4 ButtonConsider Earning a Master’s in ESL as Part of Maintaining and Renewing Your New Hampshire Teaching License and ESOL Endorsement
#5 ButtonLearn More About ESL Teacher Salary Expectations and Jobs in New Hampshire

 


 

Step 1. Earn a Degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and Qualify to Become an ESL Teacher in New Hampshire

In New Hampshire, you can earn an English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) K-12 endorsement alongside an elementary, secondary, or special education license. If you’re new to the field of education and you don’t yet have a bachelor’s degree, learning how to become an ESL teacher in New Hampshire involves completing a bachelor’s or master’s degree within an approved teacher education program and then choosing ESOL as a focus.

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Both Plymouth State University and Saint Anselm College offer ESOL minors. Plymouth State University’s TESOL minor includes 19 credits, as well as two semesters of a foreign language, while the ESOL minor at Saint Anselm College can be added to an elementary education major.

Already a certified teacher in New Hampshire and want to add an ESOL endorsement?

If you’re already a certified teacher in New Hampshire, you can add an ESOL endorsement by completing an undergraduate certificate, graduate certificate, or master’s in ESL.

Already have a bachelor’s degree in another field?

Your bachelor’s degree in another field may qualify you for a master’s degree leading to an initial teaching license. Many schools that offer bachelor’s level teaching certificate programs also offer master’s options that include all of the coursework and practical experiences necessary to become certified as a New Hampshire educator.

If you already have a bachelor’s degree, but it is not in education, you can take part in two programs to obtain ESL teacher licensure. One of these programs is known as the Teacher Education Conversion Program. In it, you can take the follow courses to learn both pedagogy and the specifics of teaching ESL:

  • Cross-cultural education: professional learning community
  • Curriculum & design and assessment in ESOL
  • Foundations of education
  • Introduction to exceptionalities
  • Instructional technology
  • Introduction to linguistics
  • Legal issues in education
  • Language, reading, and literacy in ESOL
  • Supporting students with challenging behavior

 


 

Step 2. Pass the Appropriate Praxis Exams

Once you have completed all of your education and ESL coursework, you must take and pass the appropriate Praxis exams related to your teaching license, along with the Praxis II – English to Speakers of Other Languages exam.

This examination includes the following areas of assessment:

  • Foundations of Linguistics 18%
  • Foundations of Language Learning 22%
  • Planning and Implementing Instruction 23%
  • Assessment and Evaluation 15%
  • Culture 11%
  • Professionalism and Advocacy 11%

 


 

Step 3. Complete Your Teaching Requirements and Electronic Portfolio

After you have passed the Praxis II content exam, you need to get extensive supervised teaching experience. New Hampshire requires a minimum of 360 documented hours.

Since your ESL certification is for K-12, you need to spend at least 10 hours working with each of these types of students to ensure that you are qualified to teach ESOL at every grade level:

  • K-4
  • 5-8
  • 9-12

For your ESOL minor, you will complete five semesters of clinical experiences. You will take one course that involves 30 hours of participating in a classroom. Then, you will take a course on Inclusion, Equity and Diversity. This is followed by supervised student teaching.

You will start in a Bridge Experience for one semester and will spend at least six visits equaling ten hours. For the next semester, you will be a full time student teacher for 13-15 weeks. You will teach each grade level in a variety of school settings ranging from parochial to urban.

As part of the Teacher Conversion Program, you will take either 12 credits of supervised student teaching or 7 credits of a practicum. Both of these have a component of materials and methods in ESOL education.

In all of New Hampshire’s ESOL programs, your final step will be completing your teaching portfolio to demonstrate that you have mastered the techniques of ESL teaching. You must then get it approved by the education faculty.

 


 

Step 4. Consider Earning a Master’s in ESL as Part of Maintaining and Renewing Your New Hampshire Teaching License and ESOL Endorsement

New Hampshire is part of the WIDA consortium, a multi-state consortium that supports the assessment of ELLs and the creation of instructional materials and curriculum for teaching these students. To keep up on professional development opportunities, New Hampshire ESL teachers can rely on WIDA-sponsored e-workshops, conferences and webinars.

 Another tried and tested way to get your professional development hours in while advancing in your career and boosting your ability to serve New Hampshire’s ELL students at the same time is to earn a master’s in ESL online.

You must receive a recommendation from your Superintendent to renew your educator license in New Hampshire. This will be done online, and you renew your license online or with a paper certification.

 


 

Step 5. Learn More About ESL Teacher Salary Expectations and Jobs in New Hampshire

As of May 2020, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported the following salaries for educators in New Hampshire:

 

Elementary School

Early Career (25th percentile): $48,380
Median: $60,060
Experienced (90th percentile): $81,830

 

Middle School

Early Career (25th percentile): $48,980
Median: $60,970
Experienced (90th percentile): $83,470

 

High School

Early Career (25th percentile): $50,130
Median: $62,170
Experienced (90th percentile): $82,440

 

BLS stats also reveal what ESL teachers are earning in some of New Hampshire’s largest metro areas, as of May 2020:

 

Dover (Elementary School)

Early Career (25th percentile): $51,120
Median: $62,670
Experienced (90th percentile): $94,970

 

Manchester (Middle School)

Early Career (25th percentile): $48,330
Median: $60,560
Experienced (90th percentile): $84,740

 

Portsmouth (High School)

Early Career (25th percentile): $53,490
Median: $65,260
Experienced (90th percentile): $85,720

 

Now that you are a licensed ESL teacher, you will want to stay abreast of developments in the field. The New Hampshire Department of Education has a number of ESOL resources online.

Another way to do this is to join NNETESOL—the Northern New England Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages. Its annual conference offers professional development hours and the opportunity to engage with other ESL speakers. It also offers professional training that is specific to ESL standards in New Hampshire.

 

May 2020 Bureau of Labor Statistics salary and job market trends for elementary school teachers, middle school teachers, and secondary school teachers represent state data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Data accessed June 2021.

Student population data from the National Center for Education Statistics represents English language learners (ELL) enrolled in public elementary and secondary schools in the fall of 2018.

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